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Net Neutrality or Global Net Superiority By @JamesCarlini | @ThingsExpo [#IoT]

Forget Net Neutrality. We need to re-establish Net Superiority

Passing the Net Neutrality Act is not going to make us more competitive in the global marketplace. It is not going to give "the little guy" a better platform for a start-up business. It is not the answer.

Net Neutrality has to somehow be forged into a more strategic initiative to build out the current network infrastructure with only two design constructs: It must be the fastest in the world and the most resilient in the world when it comes to reliability and redundancy built into its framework. Maybe Global Net Superiority (GNS) is more descriptive as to what we really need to facilitate.

We need to push all network carriers and other organizations, such as municipalities, to build out networks and create mega-capacities as well as accelerate network speeds if we are to accommodate the growth anticipated by those who talk about the Internet of Everything (IoE).

Increasing the baseline speeds in order to support the Internet of Everything (IoE) should not be a surprise. When predictions have the number of wireless devices going from 10 billion today to anywhere between the following for the year 2020, the network must evolve:

  • 30 billion (prediction of ABI Research)
  • 50 billion (prediction of CISCO)
  • 75 billion (prediction by Morgan-Stanley)

There is so much talk about moving to the Internet of Everything (IoE) and somehow all of this growth and traffic being predicted is going to be supported by the current network infrastructure. It can't.

The Internet of Everything (IoE) needs to be able to run on the Internet of Reality (the network infrastructure) and in order to do that, we need to be encouraging and subsidizing build-outs of new network capabilities as well as new and larger network capacities. Old rules-of-thumb for planning and designs for networks are obsolete. We should be looking at gigabit speeds for end-users and multi-gigabit speeds for enterprise networks. For backbone networks, terabit speeds will be necessary to handle all the increased traffic.

Net Neutrality Act has become politicized
First of all let's not frame "Net Neutrality" as a political issue or one that has Democrat and Republican sides. That is a recipe for disaster at best, and political gridlock (nothing gets done) at worst.

Network infrastructure is a much larger issue and rises above bi-partisan bickering and positioning in Washington, D.C. It should be viewed as something on the level of national security and be positively supported by both parties as well as all corporate entities.

Network infrastructure is a key element in sustaining our strategic, global competitiveness with all our trading partners. It should not be used as some partisan football for the benefit of either party.

We need to re-establish our country's network infrastructure as being the best in the world. We cannot do that with carriers filing lawsuits and lobbying for restrictive regulatory practices to protect "cash cow" elements of the network that are obsolete. We also cannot have any network carrier taking the approach that they will release a fast network when they think it's time.

2020 is the target year when 5G networks are supposed to roll out. Even though 5G networks have yet to be fully defined, let's define them below. (See Chart 1 - )

Chart 1: Design Criteria for Network Speeds

Type of Use

Speed

Explanation

Common End-User/ Subscriber

1-3 Gbps (One -three Gigabits per second)

This includes wireless due to what Smartphones are demanding in bandwidth

Industrial Park, Business Campus

Commercial Space

40-100Gbps

This would include next-generation Intelligent Business Campuses. (Some parks already have multiple carriers providing 40Gbps today.

Downtown/ Commercial Space

40-100Gbps

For downtown urban areas.

Backbone/ Carrier Backhaul

 

1 Tbps (One Terabit per second)

This sounds high, but the way demand is growing, this should be the goal.

Source: From LOCATION LOCATION CONNECTIVITY, James Carlini, Copyright 2014

If a company is reluctant to build out a network and another company or entity (such as a municipality) wants to replace old infrastructure with new infrastructure, it should not be hampered by restrictive, regulatory gamesmanship which is only created to protect obsolete cash cows of the incumbent phone companies.

CARLINI-ISM: Lawsuits filed to block progress on building better networks are not good for national security or national competitiveness within the global economy.


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COPYRIGHT 2015 - James Carlini

More Stories By James Carlini

James Carlini, MBA, a certified Infrastructure Consultant, keynote speaker and former award-winning Adjunct Professor at Northwestern University, has advised on mission-critical networks. Clients include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, GLOBEX, and City of Chicago’s 911 Center. An expert witness in civil and federal courts on network infrastructure, he has worked with AT&T, Sprint and others.

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.twitter.com/JAMESCARLINI

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